Note: The Ruskin Compendia

Good Folks,

During these quieter days when, hopefully, we have a few more moments for that reading we had always promised ourselves we would do if we but had the time, I’d like to suggest (you won’t be surprised!) that this might be just the chance you’ve been waiting for to delve a little more deeply into the greatness and goodness which was, and remains, Ruskin.

If such a thought intrigues, here’s a way (other than reading through the Posts on this site!) to do this. Some time ago, I put up Post 115: The Ruskin Compendia (to visit it, click on this link.), the intent of which was to let you know about what I believe are the majority of the books which selected, for general readers, passages from his works. In each case, I provided the publication details for the volume and, as a guide, included a brief commentary of my own about its contents. (NoteFor those who have visited this Post before, you should know that I update it frequently–earlier today in fact! So,it might be worth another look.)

Given that modern technology allows us the chance to sleuth in the service of causes good as well as their opposite, I would imagine that all these volumes remain available. In the Post, I suggested some places where orders could be placed. (The booksellers will be more than delighted to help you!)  In short, sitting down by the fire of an evening and reading some bits of Ruskin might prove a very nice way to spend some hours of these more sequestered days.

As an enticement, below’s the (slightly off-kilter!) cover of one of the very best of the compendia, Sir Kenneth Clark’s Ruskin Today (with his lovely reproduction of one of JR’s drawings for The Seven Lamps of Architecture on its cover). My remarks on it–all enthusiastic–can be found in the Post.

Kenneth Clark--Ruskin Today

Until next time!

Do be well out there!

🙂

Jim

P.S.: If, on going through the list of compendia in Post 115, you find that I don’t comment on another compendium which you know of, do let me know its details. I will hunt it up, have a read, and add some comments on it in due course.

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3 Responses to Note: The Ruskin Compendia

  1. shannon says:

    Thank you! Stay healthy and home and keep these coming!
    Shannon Gale

  2. Doug Seiler says:

    Jim, your previous post must have hinted at, or made a reference to, your Compendia list, because I went to the post and had that same exact thought: “What a great time to read some Ruskin”. It’s interesting you mention Ruskin Today, because, while I had read Stones and Lamps previously, I couldn’t put them in context until I read Clark’s book. Since then everything I learn about Ruskin builds on that. On the subject of compendiums – since you asked – one I don’t see in your list is (though knowing me I just missed it) “Ruskin on Architecture”, 1973, by Kristine Ottesen Garrigan. She certainly had the Ruskin bug and I found it quite interesting.

    As always, thanks so much for hosting your Why Ruskin site and for your posts.
    Take care,
    Doug Seiler

    • jimspates says:

      Hi, Doug–Thanks for this, as always. Glad you like Sir Kenneth’s lovely book. It was the first compendium I read (other than Clive’s wonderful Unto this Last–way back in 1990. We were in Cairo for a Fulbright Scholarship and would often go to Ras Muhammad on the Red Sea for the world’s most glorious snorkeling. I read Sir Kenneth crossing the Sinai in a rickety public bus! Thanks for the reminder on Kris Garrigan’s book. It’s in my library carrel when I can’t get to it now. But I will. All best!!! 🙂

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